Street artist Wanksy spray paints penises around potholes to get them filled

Good for him! 🙂

Pesky potholes have been known to stick around for years in some cities before crews are finally sent to repair them. Obscene graffiti, on the other hand, will often disappear as quickly as someone can phone in a complaint.

With this in mind, an anonymous U.K. artist who goes by the handle Wanksy began spray painting giant penis shapes around the potholes in his Greater Manchester town.

His goal? To attract the attention of local council and get the potholes fixed.

[…]

It appears as though his efforts are paying off.

The Evening News reports that within 48 hours of Wanksy’s first tagging session at the beginning of April, “many of the potholes” he’d drawn around the town of Bury had been filled.

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Russia loosens gun laws to allow people to carry rifles

Good news!

MOSCOW, Nov. 18 (UPI) — The Russian government amended gun laws Monday to allow anyone with the appropriate license to carry a rifle for self-defense.

Previously, Russians were only allowed to carry rifles for hunting, sporting events and firing range training with a license.

[…]

“You can get a lot more done with politeness and a weapon than with politeness alone.”

India wields the axe on Her Majesty’s “laughable” laws

Good news. Amusing, too.

(Reuters) – If you happen to unearth treasure worth even as little as 10 rupees (16 U.S. cents) in India, don’t even think of pocketing it – that’s because under a law introduced by the former British colonial rulers, it still belongs to “Her Majesty”.

Now, however, the Treasure Trove Act of 1878 and nearly 300 other outdated laws are set to be repealed in the largest-ever cull of rules that make India one of the most puzzling places in the world to do business.

[…]

On the chopping block along with the Treasure Trove Act is an 1838 law that says property in an area of the former imperial capital of Calcutta can only be sold to the East India Company, which laid the foundations of the British Empire but ceased to exist more than 150 years ago.

An 1855 measure removing a certain tribe from the purview of local laws because it was an “uncivilised race” will also go.

[…]

Flying kites or balloons without police permission is illegal across India as they are classified as an “aircraft” under a 1934 act, and a World War II decree outlaws the dropping of pamphlets from the air in the state of Gujarat.

Under the Motor Vehicles Act, the state of Andhra Pradesh enacted a law that a motor inspector must have a clean set of teeth and anyone with a “pigeon chest, knock knees, flat foot, hammer toes and fractured limbs” will be disqualified.

“There are instances where the entire statute is dysfunctional,” said prominent economist Bibek Debroy, who advised Modi during his election campaign and has written a book on the absurdities of Indian law.

He said that obscure laws can sometimes be abused.

A swanky New Delhi hotel was threatened with a lawsuit for refusing to give water to a person who invoked an 1867 act under which a rest house must offer passers-by free drinks of water.

Factory owners have suffered at the hands of government inspectors who insist on rules requiring spittoons to be kept in the premises as well as earthen pots for drinking water. Even if factories install modern fire extinguishers, they must still have red-painted buckets with water and sand to put out a blaze.

Would that Western countries would also abolish anachronistic laws, such as laws against possession of marijuana, for instance…