More smoking bans in Ontario

Left-liberal commie nanny/police state bastards…

In Ontario, it’s now illegal to smoke at children’s playgrounds, publicly owned sports fields and restaurant and bar patios, changes that took effect New Year’s Day.

As well, tobacco cannot be legally sold on university and college campuses.

Which simply punishes convenience stores on campuses, driving the trade to neighbouring off-campus stores, giving them a competitive edge; won’t decrease smoking one iota.

Meaning the government will still get their tax revenues, unless of course more people buy their tobacco in bulk from native reserves…

Chick logic.

Originally posted on Dalrock:

Professor 

The argument is actually quite straightforward: There are far fewer women in prison than men to start with — women make up just 7 percent of the prison population. This means that these women are disproportionately affected by a system designed for men.

Hat Tip Dr. Helen.

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Small Businesses Face Surge of Disability Lawsuits

Small Businesses Face Surge of Disability Lawsuits

Small-business are facing a sharp increase in disabled-access lawsuits in the wake of a federal appeals-court ruling that allowed so-called disabled “testers” — private individuals who aren’t patrons but visit businesses to check for violations — to take the owners to court.

Typical…

Indiana Trooper Sued for Sharing Gospel During Traffic Stop

Reblogging this here, because once again, we have a case of a police officer abusing his position; even though I’m myself a Christian, I object to this abuse of power and position.

Patriactionary

And rightly so, in my opinion.

UNION COUNTY, Indiana – A police officer in Indiana has been leveled with a lawsuit for sharing the gospel with a driver during a traffic stop.

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is representing complainant Ellen Bogan, 60, who claims that Indiana State Police trooper Brian Hamilton violated her constitutional rights by asking her about her religious beliefs after he pulled her over for an alleged traffic violation.

According to reports, the incident occurred in August in Union County, Indiana. Hamilton gave her a warning about making an illegal pass—and then asked her if she went to church anywhere. He also reportedly asked her if she had accepted Jesus as her Lord and savior.

“I’m not affiliated with any church. I don’t go to church,” Bogan told the Indianapolis Star. “I felt compelled to say I did, just because I had a state trooper standing at the…

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India wields the axe on Her Majesty’s “laughable” laws

Good news. Amusing, too.

(Reuters) – If you happen to unearth treasure worth even as little as 10 rupees (16 U.S. cents) in India, don’t even think of pocketing it – that’s because under a law introduced by the former British colonial rulers, it still belongs to “Her Majesty”.

Now, however, the Treasure Trove Act of 1878 and nearly 300 other outdated laws are set to be repealed in the largest-ever cull of rules that make India one of the most puzzling places in the world to do business.

[…]

On the chopping block along with the Treasure Trove Act is an 1838 law that says property in an area of the former imperial capital of Calcutta can only be sold to the East India Company, which laid the foundations of the British Empire but ceased to exist more than 150 years ago.

An 1855 measure removing a certain tribe from the purview of local laws because it was an “uncivilised race” will also go.

[…]

Flying kites or balloons without police permission is illegal across India as they are classified as an “aircraft” under a 1934 act, and a World War II decree outlaws the dropping of pamphlets from the air in the state of Gujarat.

Under the Motor Vehicles Act, the state of Andhra Pradesh enacted a law that a motor inspector must have a clean set of teeth and anyone with a “pigeon chest, knock knees, flat foot, hammer toes and fractured limbs” will be disqualified.

“There are instances where the entire statute is dysfunctional,” said prominent economist Bibek Debroy, who advised Modi during his election campaign and has written a book on the absurdities of Indian law.

He said that obscure laws can sometimes be abused.

A swanky New Delhi hotel was threatened with a lawsuit for refusing to give water to a person who invoked an 1867 act under which a rest house must offer passers-by free drinks of water.

Factory owners have suffered at the hands of government inspectors who insist on rules requiring spittoons to be kept in the premises as well as earthen pots for drinking water. Even if factories install modern fire extinguishers, they must still have red-painted buckets with water and sand to put out a blaze.

Would that Western countries would also abolish anachronistic laws, such as laws against possession of marijuana, for instance…